Patients Frequently Asked Questions

Total Hip Arthroplasty

How long may I expect to stay in the hospital?

Depending on the general state of your health, you may be able to go home on the day of your surgery if your pain is well managed. If you have other medical issues, your health and safety will likely best best served by an overnight stay in the hospital. Most of the total hip arthroplasty patients are able to go home the morning after surgery. The APS team will ensure that your pain control is optimum. The Surgical and PT/OT teams will ensure that your post-surgical status is appropriate and that your mobility allows you to meet your personal care needs at home, with the assistance of your family. If the block you have is providing proper and manageable pain control, you may choose to be discharged with it in place.

How will my operating room care be accomplished?

Before the placement of the appropriate nerve block for postoperative pain control,
the intraoperative anesthetic care will be discussed with you. The APS team and your surgeon recommend, where feasible, a spinal anesthetic, for your operative procedure. In certain medical considerations, a general anesthetic may be in your best interest.

How will the nerve block be cared for when I go home?

Before you are discharged, the APS team will see you. Specific instructions will be provided and you will receive a battery-operated infusion pump containing 400 mL of 0.2% ropivacaine. The setting will be reviewed with you and your family. You will be given a number that you can call anytime. A representative from the APS will call you every day while the pain pump is infusing. When it is empty or has been off for 2 hours, please call the number provided. Your family member will be guided in a step-by-step manner to accomplish the removal of the perineural catheter.

I am being treated for chronic pain. How will this affect my care?

Anyone that is prescribed medication for chronic pain should, with the knowledge of his/her surgeon and APS physician, continue these medications the morning of surgery. The surgical team will continue your established treatment during and after your discharge. It is important that you stipulate during your pre-anesthetic evaluation what medication(s) you take for chronic pain. Continuing your established regimen, the use of the nerve block, and multi-modal therapy produces well-tolerated pain management in cases such as yours.

May I CHOOSE a general anesthetic?

You may choose a general anesthetic (GA). GA is perfectly reasonable and safe for
your hip operation. It does require the administration of medication that produces
unconsciousness and complete muscle relaxation. In addition, an “airway device” is inserted after you fall asleep. This device is removed before you awaken.
GA is quite safe and is widely used. If you have had back surgery or problems,
the APS or OR teams may suggest GA. Multiple medical conditions or extremes in body habitus at times necessitate GA. These are issue-specific conversations that may be had prior to your block procedure.

May I go home the day of surgery?

Some patients may elect to go home on the day of surgery. Those that choose this option coordinate this early in the preoperative stages with their surgeon’s office. The APS is made aware, as are the PT/OT staff, and the appropriate home health agencies. If mobility goals are met and your pain is manageable, you may be discharged home.

What if I am allergic to one of these medications?

In the case of an allergy, the medication will be eliminated from your regimen.

What if there is a problem with removal of the perineural catheter?

The APS at UF has placed literally thousands of these devices successfully. We currently place about 6500 perineural catheters per year. The incidence of difficulty with removal is extremely low. We send you home with this device with great confidence that the removal will be uneventful. In the highly unlikely occurrence of difficulty, you may be asked to return to the block room. We then may visualize the catheter and adjacent structures under ultrasound to aid in its removal.

What is “multi-modal” pain therapy?

This is an approach whereby the pain generators that produce the inflammatory response are addressed. Specifically, Decadron (a steroid) and ketoralac decrease or limit the body’s response to the surgical procedure by decreasing the production of chemicals produced internally. In addition to initiating the healing process, these chemical are pain mediators. The medications reduce the release of this “chemical process” without interfering with healing, thus lessening the pain response.

What is a spinal anesthetic?

A spinal anesthetic consists of placing a small dose (2 mL) of bupivacaine into the subarachnoid space (spinal canal). This is done in the operating room after proper sedation and positioning. The skin over your lower back will be numbed prior to
this procedure. A small needle (24-gauge) is placed through the skin between the lower lumbar vertebrae into the spinal canal. Once reached, 2 mL of bupivacaine is instilled though the needle. The needle is then removed. You may notice a warm sensation in your hips and thighs. You will be placed supine, sedation through the vein will begin, and then you will be placed with your operative hip in the “up” position. The OR anesthetic team, nursing team, and surgeon will ensure your comfort and safety throughout this process.

What is the biggest risk I face after my hip replacement?

There are many and myriad of potential difficulties to be considered.
However, the greatest risk you face and the easiest to avoid is a FALL.
In the hospital and at home, you must comply with the mobility and ambulation
instructions prescribed by your surgeon and the PT/OT team. Adherence
to these instructions and compliance with prescribed medication is
extremely vital to your safe and successful recovery and rehabilitation.

What type of pain control may I expect after my surgery?

Your surgeon will refer you to the Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine Division at UF (APS). You will be offered a continuous nerve block. This will be placed in the Block Procedure Area, under proper sedation, prior to your operation.
During the operation, in addition to your anesthetic, you will be given IV acetaminophen, IV Decadron, and IV ketorolac as the initiation of “multi-modal” therapy for postoperative pain management. These medications will be continued, by mouth, into your postoperative recovery.

Where will I go after the surgical procedure?

When the surgical procedure is completed, you will go to the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) where you will awaken and recover from the anesthetic effects. When appropriate, your family may come to your bedside. The APS will visit at your bedside if your block needs to be evaluated. You will have an x-ray to verify the stability of your new hip. Physical and occupational therapy (PT/OT) will visit in the PACU. If you have had a spinal anesthetic, your sensation will gradually return. When your motor strength is judged appropriate, you may be assisted to ambulate at that time. If you have chosen to go home on the day of your procedure, PT/OT and the APS team will ensure you that have met mobility and pain control goals.

Why is a spinal anesthetic preferred?

A spinal anesthetic provides a very stable anesthetic course. While intravenous
sedation is provided, major anesthetic drugs that produce unconsciousness are not needed. Years of experience and documentation in the surgical and anesthetic literature
show that intraoperative blood loss occurs is less during arthroplasty performed under spinal anesthesia. With proper sedation and care in positioning, the patient experience is pain free and recall of intraoperative events is quite limited.

Why use a nerve block AND medicines IV and by mouth?

The nerve block is placed and dosed well before beginning the surgical procedure, thus interrupting nerve ”signals” from the surgical site BEFORE they occur. The IV and oral medications work together with the nerve block to lessen the body’s inflammatory/pain response. A lower overall dose of “numbing drugs” and oral medications may be used.

Will my pain control be adequate when the pain catheter is removed?

A perineural catheter that has been infusing for 3 to 4 days allows the body to recover to a point where the major inflammatory processes and pain responses have been greatly reduced. Continuing beyond 4 days (1 hospital day and 3 home days) with the perineural catheter is rarely considered. The oral regimen prescribed by your surgeon provides continued relief from discomfort during the recovery and rehabilitation process.

Will narcotic drugs be a part of my pain treatment?

The sedation during the block procedure is a potent yet short-acting narcotic to ensure that you are comfortable during this process. During the operation, narcotics are a very small part (if any) of your anesthetic. Postoperatively, a “less potent” narcotic, Tramadol, will be used as a part of the multi-modal regimen. Oxycodone is reserved for breakthrough pain. IV narcotics are used sparingly and as a last resort after bedside evaluation by an APS physician and perhaps an orthopaedic surgeon. Your surgeon will discharge you with a short-term prescription for the narcotic of his/her choice.

Total Knee Arthroplasty

How long may I expect to stay in the hospital?

Depending on the general state of your health, you may be able to go home on the day of your surgery if your pain is well managed. If you have other medical issues, your health and safety will likely best best served by an overnight stay in the hospital. Most of the total hip arthroplasty patients are able to go home the morning after surgery. The APS team will ensure that your pain control is optimum. The surgical and PT/OT teams will ensure that your post-surgical status is appropriate and that your mobility allows you to meet your personal care needs at home, with the assistance of your family. If the block you have is providing proper and manageable pain control, you may choose to be discharged with it in place.

How will my operating room care be accomplished?

Before the placement of the appropriate nerve block for postoperative pain control,
the intraoperative anesthetic care will be discussed with you. The APS team and your surgeon recommend, where feasible, a spinal anesthetic, for your operative procedure. In certain medical considerations a general anesthetic may be in your best interest.

How will the nerve block be cared for when I go home?

Before you are discharged, the APS team will see you. Specific instructions will be provided and you will receive a battery-operated infusion pump containing 400 mL of 0.2% ropivacaine. The setting will be reviewed with you and your family. You will be given a number that you can call anytime. A representative from the APS will call you every day while the pain pump is infusing. When it is empty or has been off for 2 hours, please call the number provided. Your family member will be guided in a step-by-step manner to accomplish the removal of the perineural catheter.

I am being treated for chronic pain. How will this affect my care?

Anyone that is prescribed medication for chronic pain should, with the knowledge of his/her surgeon and APS physician, continue these medications the morning of surgery. The surgical team will continue your established treatment during and after your discharge. It is important that you stipulate during your pre-anesthetic evaluation what medication(s) you take for chronic pain. Continuing your established regimen, the use of the nerve block, and multi-modal therapy produces well-tolerated pain management in cases such as yours.

May I CHOOSE a general anesthetic?

You may choose a general anesthetic (GA). GA is perfectly reasonable and safe for
your knee operation. It does require the administration of medication that produces
unconsciousness and complete muscle relaxation. In addition, an “airway device” is inserted after you fall asleep. This device is removed before you awaken.
GA is quite safe and is widely used. If you have had back surgery or problems, the APS or OR teams may suggest GA. Multiple medical conditions or extremes in body habitus at times necessitate GA. These are issue-specific conversations that may be had prior to your block procedure.

May I go home the day of surgery?

Some patients may elect to go home on the day of surgery. Those that choose this option coordinate this early in the preoperative stages with their surgeon’s office. The APS is made aware, as are the PT/OT staff and the appropriate home health agencies. If
mobility goals are met and your pain is manageable, you may be discharged home.

What if I am allergic to one of these medications?

In the case of an allergy, the medication will be eliminated from your regimen.

What is “multi-modal” pain therapy?

This is an approach whereby the pain generators that produce the inflammatory response are addressed. Specifically, Decadron (a steroid) and ketoralac decrease or limit the body’s response to the surgical procedure by decreasing the production of chemicals produced internally. In addition to initiating the healing process, these chemical are pain mediators. The medications reduce the release of this “chemical process” without interfering with healing, thus lessening the pain response.

What is a spinal anesthetic?

A spinal anesthetic consists of placing a small dose (2 ml) of bupivacaine into the subarachnoid space (spinal canal). This is done in the operating room after proper sedation and positioning. The skin over your lower back will be numbed prior to
this procedure. A small needle (24-gauge) is placed through the skin
between the lower lumbar vertebrae into the spinal canal. Once reached, 2 mL of bupivacaine is instilled though the needle. The needle is then removed. You may notice a warm sensation in your hips and thighs. You will be placed supine and sedation through the vein will begin.
The OR anesthetic team, nursing team, and your surgeon will assure your comfort and safety throughout this process.

What type of pain control may I expect after my surgery?

Your surgeon will refer you to the Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine Division at UF (APS). You will be offered a continuous nerve block. This will be placed in the Block Procedure Area, under proper sedation, prior to your operation.
During the operation, in addition to your anesthetic, you will be given IV acetaminophen, IV Decadron, and IV ketorolac as the initiation of “multi-modal” therapy for postoperative pain management. These medications will be continued, by mouth, into your postoperative recovery.

Where will I go after the surgical procedure?

When the surgical procedure is completed, you will go to the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) where you will recover from the anesthetic effects. When appropriate, your family may come to your bedside. The APS will visit you at the bedside if your block needs to be evaluated. Physical and occupational therapy (PT/OT) will visit you in the PACU. If you have had a spinal anesthetic, your sensation will gradually return. When your motor strength is judged appropriate, you may be assisted to ambulate at that time.
If you have chosen to go home on the day of your procedure, PT/OT and the APS will
ensure that you have met mobility and pain control goals.

Why is a spinal anesthetic preferred?

A spinal anesthetic provides a very stable anesthetic course. While intravenous
sedation is provided, major anesthetic drugs that produce unconsciousness are not needed. Years of experience and documentation in the surgical and anesthetic literature
show that intraoperative blood loss occurs less during arthroplasty performed under spinal anesthesia. With proper sedation and care in positioning, the patient experience is pain free and recall of intraoperative events is quite limited.

Why use a nerve block AND medicines IV and by mouth?

The nerve block is placed and dosed well before beginning the surgical procedure, thus interrupting nerve “signals” from the surgical site BEFORE they occur. The IV and oral medications work together with the nerve block to lessen the body’s inflammatory/pain response. A lower overall dose of “numbing drugs” and oral medications may be used.

Will narcotic drugs be a part of my pain treatment?

The sedation during the block procedure is a potent yet short-acting narcotic to ensure that you are comfortable during this process. During the operation, narcotics are a very small part (if any) of your anesthetic. Postoperatively, a “less potent” narcotic, Tramadol, will be used as a part of the “multi-modal” regimen. Oxycodone is reserved for breakthrough pain. IV narcotics are used sparingly and as a last resort after bedside evaluation by an APS physician and perhaps an orthopaedic surgeon. Your surgeon will discharge you with a short-term prescription for the narcotic of his/her choice.

Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

Are there any special considerations at discharge?

When discharged from the hospital, if you go home with a continuous infusion pain control device, you must be accompanied by someone who will be with you for the first 3 days after your surgery. You may not go home alone.

How will my operating room care be accomplished?

For a Total Shoulder Arthroplasty, a general anesthetic is the best plan and technique. The draping and positioning process will render you immobile and the sterile drapes will cover your face. You must remain in this position throughout the procedure. Even with a surgical-quality nerve block, your intraoperative comfort during a regional-only technique would not be in your best interest. The presence of the nerve block enables your anesthetic team to provide a “lighter” general anesthetic.

How will the nerve block be cared for when I go home?

Before you are discharged, the APS team will see you, give you specific instructions, and connect a battery-operated infusion pump containing 400 mL of 0.2% ropivacaine. The setting will be reviewed with you and your family. You will be given a number that you can call anytime. A representative from the APS will call you every day while the pain pump is infusing. When it is empty or has been off for 2 hours, please call the number provided. Your family member will be guided in a step-by-step manner to accomplish the removal of the perineural catheter.

I am being treated for chronic pain. How will this affect my care?

Anyone that is prescribed medication for chronic pain should, with the knowledge of his/her surgeon and APS physician, continue these medications the morning of surgery. The surgical team will continue your established treatment during and after your discharge. It is important that you stipulate during your pre-anesthetic evaluation what medication(s) you take for chronic pain. Continuing your established regimen, the use of the nerve block, and multi-modal therapy produces well-tolerated pain management in cases such as yours.

What if I am allergic to one of these medications?

In the case of an allergy, the medication will be eliminated from your regimen.

What if there is a problem with removal of the perineural catheter?

The APS at UF has placed literally thousands of these devices successfully. We currently place about 6500 perineural catheters per year. The incidence of difficulty with removal is extremely low. We send you home with this device with great confidence that the removal will be uneventful. In the highly unlikely occurrence of difficulty, you may be asked to return to the block room. We may then visualize the catheter and adjacent structures under ultrasound to aid in its removal.

What is “multi-modal” pain therapy?

This is an approach whereby the pain generators that produce the inflammatory response are addressed. Specifically, Decadron (a steroid) and ketoralac decrease or limit the body’s response to the surgical procedure by decreasing the production of chemicals produced internally. In addition to initiating the healing process, these chemical are pain mediators. The medications reduce the release of this “chemical process” without interfering with healing, thus lessening the pain response.

What is the aftercare for a perineural catheter?

Once the infusion is complete or has been discontinued for 2 hours AND your motor and sensory function has returned, you may call the APS for removal guidance. Once the device is removed, the area may be cleaned with alcohol to remove any residual adhesive. A clean, dry band-aid may be placed over the site.

What type of pain control may I expect after my surgery?

Your surgeon will refer you to the Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine Division at UF (APS). You will be offered a continuous nerve block. This will be placed in the Block Procedure Area, under proper sedation, prior to your operation.

During the operation, in addition to your anesthetic, you will be given, IV acetaminophen, IV Decadron, and IV ketorolac as the initiation of “multi-modal” therapy for postoperative pain management. These medications will be continued, by mouth, into your postoperative recovery.

When will I be able to return home?

Depending on the general state of your health, you may be able to go home on the day of your surgery if your pain is well managed. If you have other medical issues, your health and safety will likely best best served by an overnight stay in the hospital. Most of the total shoulder arthroplasty patients are able to go home the morning after surgery. The APS team will ensure that your pain control is optimum. The surgical and physical and occupational therapy (PT/OT) teams will ensure that your post-surgical status is appropriate and that your mobility allows you to meet your personal care needs at home, with the assistance of your family.

Where will I go after the surgical procedure?

When the surgical procedure is completed, you will go the the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) where you will awaken and recover from the anesthetic effects. When appropriate, your family may come to your bedside.

Why use a Nerve Block AND medicines IV and by mouth?

The nerve block is placed and dosed well before beginning the surgical procedure, thus interrupting nerve “signals” from the surgical site BEFORE they occur. The IV and oral medications work together with the nerve block to lessen the body’s inflammatory/pain response. A lower overall dose of “numbing drugs” and oral medications may be used.

Will narcotic drugs be a part of my pain treatment?

The sedation during the block procedure is a potent yet short-acting narcotic to ensure that you are comfortable during this process. During the operation, narcotics are a very small part (if any) of your anesthetic. Postoperatively, a “less potent” narcotic, Tramadol, will be used as a part of the “multi-modal” regimen. Oxycodone is reserved for breakthrough pain. IV narcotics are used sparingly and as a last resort after bedside evaluation by an APS physician and perhaps an orthopaedic surgeon. Your surgeon will discharge you with a short-term prescription for the narcotic of his/her choice.

ADVERTISING SPACE

paulbigeleisenProfessor Bigeleisen works clinically in the operating rooms at the University of Maryland Medical Center with his emphasis on pain medicine. He is a very accomplished researcher and author and his areas of special interest include nerve microanatomy and intraneural injection.

DrMiguelworks in a Department of Anesthesiology that comprises six University Hospitals (Group HM). He is Professor of Anaesthesia and Critical Care in the School of Medicine at the University CEU San Pablo. For the past 20 years he has been leading various lines of research regarding the ultrastructure of the human spinal meninges including the dura mater, arachnoid layer, trabecular arachnoid, pia mater, subdural compartment, nerve roots, nerve root cuffs, epidural fat, ligamentum flavum and peripheral nerves.

ProfessorGerbrandGroenProfessor Gerbrand Groen works at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), in Groningen in the Netherlands. He is also on the executive committee of the Dutch Pain Society and has published widely on a wide range of subjects including anatomy and especially microanatomy of peripheral nerves.

DrNizarMoayeriDr. Nizar Moayeri is a neurosurgeon with special interests in the anatomy and microanatomy of peripheral nerves and intraneural injections. He works at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands.

UtrechtUniversityUtrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

APB Mugshot (300-1080)Professor André Boezaart heads the Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine and Acute Pain Service at the University of Florida. He has a special interest in applied anatomy, microanatomy and continuous nerve blocks, especially ambulatory continuous nerve block and opioid-sparing pain management. He is working on a number of projects including projects on microanatomy of nerves and intraneural injections

BuckenmaierColonel Chester “Trip” Buckenmaier III, MD is the current Director of the Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management and Fellowship Director of the Acute Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington DC. He is a Professor in Anesthesiology at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and a Diplomat, with the American Board of Anesthesiology.

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Professor Andre Boezaart, MD.PhD

Professor André P. Boezaart
MBChB, MPraxMed, DA(CMSA), FFA(CMSA), MMed(Anaest), PhD
Professor of Anesthesiology and Orthopaedic Surgery (with Tenure)
Departments of Anesthesiology and Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation
Chief Division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine
University of Florida College of Medicine
Chief Acute Pain Service
UFHealth
Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
Professor André Boezaart heads the Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine and Acute Pain Service at the University of Florida. He has a special interest in applied anatomy, microanatomy and continuous nerve blocks, especially ambulatory continuous nerve block and opioid-sparing pain management. He is working on a number of projects including projects on microanatomy of nerves and intraneural injections

Click here to view his BIO and CV

Dr.Michael Kent, M.D.,

Assistant Professor
Department of Anesthesiology

Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC
USA

Pain Medicine Service
Duke Univercity
Durham North Carolina
USA

Click here to view his CV

Professor Paul E. Bigeleisen, M.D.

Professor of Anesthesiology
Department of Anesthesiology
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Baltimore MD, 21201
Professor Bigeleisen works clinically in the operating rooms at the University of Maryland Medical Center with his emphasis on pain medicine. He is a very accomplished researcher and author and his areas of special interest include nerve microanatomy and intraneural injection.

Click here to view his CV

Dr.Donald S. Bohannon, M.D.

Associate Professor of Anesthesiology
Department of Anesthesiology
Division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine
University of Florida College of Medicine
Dr. Donald Bohannon is an Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Director of Transition to Practice Resident Rotation. His interests include Regional Anesthesia, Perioperative Pain Medicine, and Ambulatory Anesthesia.

Click here to view his CV

Dr. David A. Edwards MD, PhD

Associate Professor
Clinical Chief of Inpatient Chronic Pain Service
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Department of Anesthesiology
Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Dr. Edwards is the Clinical Chief of Inpatient Chronic Pain Service at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He is boarded in Anesthesiology (University of Florida) and Pain Medicine (Massachusetts General Hospital) and teaches in the outpatient clinic, in the operating room, and on regional and acute pain and chronic pain services. His clinical interests are on the chronic outcomes of perioperative medicine.

Click here view his CV

Dr. Linda Le-Wendling, MD.

Associate Professor of Anesthesiology
Department of Anesthesiology
Division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine
Director, Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine Fellowship, University of Florida College of Medicine
Gainesville,
Florida
United States of America
Dr. Linda Le-Wendling, MD works in the division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine and Acute Pain Service at the University of Florida. She is the Director of the APPM Fellowship program at UF and has a passion for teaching APPM and RA to residents, fellows and students.

Click here to view her Bio

Dr.Hari Parvataneni, MD

Associate Professor
Peter Gearen, M.D. Endowed Professorship in Orthopaedics
Division Chief
Adult Arthroplasty and Joint Reconstruction, Joint Replacement
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation
University of Florida College of Medicine
Hari Parvataneni is an Orthopaedic Surgeon specializing in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty. He is fellowship director & division chief of Arthroplasty & Joint Reconstruction at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He has longstanding interest and track record in collaborative, patient-centered, evidence-based, value-based and outcomes-based clinical care. Consequently, he is a very strong proponent of regional anesthesia for Orthopaedic surgery.

Click here to view her Bio

Professor Miguel Angel Reina MD, PhD

Professor of Anaesthesia and Critical Care in the School of Medicine at the University CEU
San Pablo
Dr. Miguel A. Reina works in a Department of Anesthesiology that comprises six University Hospitals (Group HM). He is Professor of Anaesthesia and Critical Care in the School of Medicine at the University CEU San Pablo. For the past 20 years he has been leading various lines of research regarding the ultrastructure of the human spinal meninges including the dura mater, arachnoid layer, trabecular arachnoid, pia mater, subdural compartment, nerve roots, nerve root cuffs, epidural fat, ligamentum flavum and peripheral nerves.

Click here to view his Bio

Professor Alain Borgeat, M.D.,

Head of the Department of Anesthesiology,
Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist,
Zurich, Switzerland
Full Professor for Regional Anesthesia of the University of Zurich.

Click here to view his CV

Professor Adrian Bösenberg MBChB, DA(CMSA), FFA(CMSA)

Affiliation Pediatric Anesthesiologist
Seattle Children’s Hospital Washington
Director Regional Anaesthesia
Co-director Academic Affairs Seattle Children’s

Click here to view his CV

Colonel Chester “Trip” Buckenmaier III, MD

Director of the Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management
Fellowship Director of the Acute Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Washington DC.
Professor in Anesthesiology at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

Click here to view his CV

Professor Kenneth D. Candido MD

Professor of Clinical Anesthesiology-UIC
Chairman, Department of Anesthesiology Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center
836 West Wellington Avenue; Suite 4815
Chicago, IL 60657 /p>

Click here to view his CV

Professor Xavier Capdevila, MD, PhD

Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
Chair at the Medical University in Montpellier, France.
Head of the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
Lapeyronie University Hospital,
Montpellier,
France.

Click here to view his CV

Professor Jacques E. Chelly MD, PhD, MBA

Professor of Anesthesiology (with Tenure) and Orthopedic Surgery
Vice Chair of Clinical Research
Director of the Division of Regional Anesthesia and Acute
Interventional Perioperative Pain
Director of Regional Fellowship
Director of Orthopedic Anesthesia Fellowship
Department of Anesthesiology
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Director Acute Interventiona
Professor, Department of Anesthesia
University of Toronto,
Toronto,
Ontario, Canada

Click here to view his Bio

Professor Laura Clark, MD

Professor and Director, Acute Pain and Regional Anesthesia
Director, Residency Program
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
University of Louisville, School of Medicine,
Louisville, Kentucky

Dr. Nabil M. Elkassabany, MD

Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care
Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Departments of Anesthesiology and Orthopaedic Surgery
Director of the Orthopedic Anesthesia Section
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
Veteran’s Administration Medical Center,
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Philadelphia, PA

Click here view his Bio and CV

Dr. Clint E. Elliott, MD

Staff Anesthesiologist
Director of Orthopedic Anesthesia
Department of Anesthesiology
Ochsner Medical Center
New Orleans, LA, USA
Associate Lecturer, The University of Queensland, Brisbane St Lucia, QLD 4072 Australia

Click here view his Bio and CV

Professor Carlo D. Franco

Professor Carlo D. Franco, MD works in the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at the JHS Hospital of Cook County in Chicago, IL, where he is Chairman of Orthopedic Anesthesia. He is also a Professor of Anesthesiology and Anatomy at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL. Professor Franco started his career as a surgeon in Chile, after which he became an Anatomist and later an Anesthesiologists. He is a very popular invitee at meetings where his knowledge of dissections and anatomy is always highly sought.

Click here to view his CV

Dr. Fredrickson Michael, MD

Full time clinical anaesthesiologist – private practice setting, Auckland, New Zealand.
Honorary clinical senior lecturer, Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Auckland.

Click here view his Bio

Professor Sugantha Ganapathy D.A, FRCA, FFARCS(IRE), FRCPC

Professor Emeritus, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine
University of Western Ontario
Director, Regional and Pain Research
London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital London, Ontario, Canada

Click here to view her CV

Dr. Michael Gofeld, MD, FRCPC

Associate Professor, University of Toronto
Staff Physician, Departments of Anesthesia, St Michael’s and Women’s College Hospitals, Toronto, Canada
Adult Chronic Pain Network MOHLTC, Chair of Registry Committee

Click here to view his BIO

Professor Vijaya N.R. Gottumukkala, M.B., B.S., M.D.(Anes),

Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Division of Anesthesiology and Critical Care,
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Click here to view his CV

Professor Nikolaus Gravenstein, MD

Professor of Anesthesiology
Departments of Anesthesiology
University of Florida College of Medicine
Gainesville, Florida
United States of America

Click here view his Bio

Professor Roy A. Greengrass MD

Professor of Anesthesiology
Departments of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine
Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida
United States of America

Tiaan Hancke

Chief CRNA at Texas Health Presbyterian in Kaufman, Texas.
Owner of Genesis Anesthesia PLLC and Kaufman Orthopedic Pain Management PLLC.

Click here to view his BioandCV

Professor Rob Hurley MD, PhD

Professor of Anesthesiology
Department of Anesthesiology
Vice-Chairman for Pain Medicin,
Department of Anesthesiology
Medical Director, MCW Pain Management Center
Medical College of Wisconsin,
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
Chair, Pain Care Strategic Initiative, Froedtert Health, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Click here to view his Bio and CV

Dr. Barys V. Ihnatsenka, M.D.

Associate Professor of Anesthesiology
Department of Anesthesiology Division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine
University of Florida College of Medicine
Gainesville, Florida
United States of America

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Professor Manoj Karmakar MBBS, MD, DA (UK), FRCA FHKCA, FHKAM

Professor, Director of Paediatric Anaesthesia
Secretary General of the Asian Oceanic Society of Regional Anaesthesia (AOSRA)
Immediate Past President of the Asian Society of Paediatric Anaesthesiologist’s (ASPA)
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Main Clinical Block and Trauma Center Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT,
Hong Kong

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Dr. Randall Malchow, MD.

Assistant Chief of Anesthesiology
VA Medical Centers
Murfreesboro, TN,
Staff Anesthesiologist
Nashville, TN, USA

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Professor Colin McCartney MBChB, FCARCSI, FRCA, FRPC PhD

Professor and Chair of Anesthesiology
Staff Anesthesiologist
Scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Ottawa, Canada

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Dr. Patrick Narchi, MD.

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Centre Clinical
Soyaux
France.

Dr. Anahi Perlas, MD, FRCPC

Associate Professor of Anesthesia
University of Toronto
Director of the Clinical Regional Anesthesia Program
Toronto Western Hospital
Toronto Canada

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Professor Meg Rosenblatt MD

Professor and Chair
Department of Anesthesiology
Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and West Hospitals
New York, NY,
USA

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Dr. Cameron R. Smith MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology
Division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine
Department of Anesthesiology
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL

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Dr. Patrick Tighe, M.D., M.S.

Associate Professor (with Tenure)
Division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine
Department of Anesthesiology
Chief, Perioperative Analytics Group
Associate Professor, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery
Affiliate Associate Professor, Dept. of Information Sciences and Operations Research, Warrington College of Business
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida, USA

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Dr. De QH Tran, MD

Associate Professor
Department of Anesthesia
Montreal General Hospital,
McGill University
Montreal, Canada

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Dr. Peter Van de Putte M.D

Staff anesthetist Department of Anesthesiology of the hospital AZ Monica, campus Deurne,
Antwerp
Clinical director of the operating theatre and the one day clinic.

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Professor Andre van Zundert

Professor & Chairman Discipline of Anesthesiology
Chair, University of Queensland ‘Burns, Trauma & Critical Care Research Centre’
Chair, University of Queensland ‘Centre of Excellence & Innovation in Anaesthesia’
Department of Anaesthesia and Peri-operative Medicine
Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital
Herston, Queensland, Australia

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Professor Guy Weinberg, M.D.

Professor, Department of Anesthesiology
University of Illinois College of Medicine
Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
Chicago, IL

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Dr. Yury Zasimovich, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology
Department of Anesthesiology
Associate Director, Division of Acute and Perioperative Pain Medicine
University of Florida College of Medicine
Gainesville, Florida, USA

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Professor Philip Peng

Professor, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management Director, Anesthesia Chronic Pain Program,
University Health Network
Director, Wasser pain Management Center,
Mount Sinai Hospital
University of Toronto
Canada

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Dr. Xavier Sala-Blanch, MD

Anesthesiology and Anatomy
Anesthesiology and Anatomy Hospital Clínic. Universitat of Barcelona,
Barcelona,
Spain

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